1. Chinese dining etiquette is full of significant traditions. Observance reflects well on your family and how they brought you up.

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Learn your way around a lazy susan, as everything is done family style.

2. Leave the ordering to the host.

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You just show up and eat whatever is in front of you.

3. Bring your appetite because you can count on about 10 courses.

It's a marathon, not a sprint.

4. For food and tea, always serve from oldest to youngest and yourself last.

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5. There will be tea.

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6. The proper way to pour tea is by holding down the lid.

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7. Tap with two fingers as someone is pouring for you to show appreciation.

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This was started by an emperor who often toured his kingdom undercover. He would pour tea for his guards, who couldn't blow his cover, so they bowed for the honor with their fingers.

8. Pouring for everyone before yourself means you run out of tea a lot. Signal for more by turning over the lid or propping it ajar.

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9. When making toasts, holding your cup with two hands is a sign of respect.

One handed toasts signals laziness and disrespect. If you're the oldest at the table, you're exempt from this — like most things on this list. Do whatever you want, boo.

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One handed toasts signals laziness and disrespect. If you're the oldest at the table, you're exempt from this — like most things on this list. Do whatever you want, boo.

10. If you're someone's plus one, let the person who invited you serve you. So, if you invited someone, you have to serve him/her.

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But don't start feeding 'em at the table, cuz that would be weird.

11. Meals are always kicked off with a soup.

Adding condiments isn't common practice (sorry, soy sauce), but for soups, you sometimes add red vinegar and white pepper.

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Adding condiments isn't common practice (sorry, soy sauce), but for soups, you sometimes add red vinegar and white pepper.

12. If serving utensils aren't provided, use the backend of your chopsticks to get food.